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11/10/2017

Never Forget #mfrwauthor

By the time they've reached a certain age, most people have experienced a number of unforgettable events. Graduation from high school and maybe later college, getting married and the birth of their first child, or the death of a loved one. I decided to go elsewhere for the post and select another day that will take generations before we forget it -- September 11, 2001.

The impact of the date goes beyond the attack on the national psyche it was personal. Although the fall of the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center and the crash of  United Flight 93 near Shanksville, Pennsylvania, can technically be considered two events, for me they are one, inextricably entwined. No I did not forget the losses at the Pentagon, but read on and you'll see why the other two crashes affected me more.


On the date now simply called 9-11, I lived across the bay from lower Manhattan and stood on the boardwalk watching the smoke rise from the buildings. Other connections were working in the north tower for several years and knowing someone who died on Flight 93. The picture is the tower of light memorial that was held for several years on the anniversary of 9-11. Hundreds of local residents would go to local boardwalks to view the tribute. Even if it was only a slow drive along the shore road or a few moments of quiet prayer standing at the water's edge.


Tribute in Lights (Used under Creative Commons CCO License, via Pixabay)
September 11th also impacted me as a writer. At the time I was finishing up a local history. The impact to the nation and on the community dictated the event be acknowledged in the book. Especially considering town resident's lost in the towers and on Flight 93. What was initially planned as a few lines turned into a chapter--and a warning. With emotions so raw at the time, purchasers were warned about the final chapter in the book so they wouldn't be blindsided. Those same emotions of anger and loss reared again years later when another local history, this time one of an organization was written. One of those lost on Flight 93 was a leader of the church and included in the book, which meant reliving those dark days.

What's a day you'll never forget because of its impact on you? Feel free to share in the comments and be sure to visit the other posts in the challenge. 


~till next time, Helen


13 comments:

  1. That was definitely a day that drew a permanent line in the sand for most of us, I think, so that everything is charted in memory as before and after. Everybody remembers exactly where they were when they first heard the news. I was in my bedroom watching the morning news and getting ready to start writing. I didn't write that day or for many days afterward. A very sad, tragic day for sure.

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    1. didn't think of it as line in the sand as such but you're right after before and after. Before 9-11 the where were you questions dealt with JFK or Pearl Harbor. Now a third was added. Thanks for stopping by.

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  2. I didn't even think about that day when I sat down to write my post, but you're right, I can remember the details of that morning very clearly.

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    1. Just before I sat down to write the post I was cleaning out photos and came across a packet from the Macey's firework cruise we took my mother on. ANd since the staging area for the ship was across from the Liberty Tower I had a pic of the building. Which made me think of the original ones. Thanks for stopping by.

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  3. A cousin of mine is a pilot for United, and his 'milk run' was flight 93. On that fateful day, though, he'd been summoned to take over a flight to Europe.

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    1. wow. I'd ask him to buy me a lottery ticket.

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  4. Wow. Very impact-filled post, Helen. Thank you so much for sharing.

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    1. Even more than a decade and a half later, to some in the northeast, the emotions are still raw. Of course, there was almost daily news stories for the first five or so years so healing really couldn't begin for a long time. Thanks for stopping by.

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  5. You're right about this being an unforgettable day. This is a day that I'll always remember.

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  6. That is s very memorable day. I was at work and they tuned all the TV’s in elections to it, had one in the break room.

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  7. Wonderful post Helen. 9-11 changed things for the nation. People to this day can still recall where they were and what they were doing when they heard the news. It is a day that won't be forgotten.

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  8. Yes, 9/11 is for us what December 7, 1941 was for my parents in WWII. I had friends who were in the air on the way to NYC when it happened (their plane was among the hundreds forced to land ASAP). My boss had just been in the World Trade Center 5 days before (he was pretty shell-shocked). My husband was active duty in the Air Force, so he was locked down for more than 24 hours. We lived in Colorado Springs which houses NORAD (North American Aerospace Defense) and has other military installations that "drive" many of our satellites and no one really knew what was happening for awhile (hence the military lock-down). My heart bled for the victims and seeing the towers fall over and over and over on t.v. was horrifying. It was truly an unforgettable day.

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